Nurses make change happen. Be a part of history. #nursesmakechangehappen -- This toolkit was created to give nurses the tools to do their part in the national vaccine effort. It is designed to help you decrease vaccine hesitancy and increase vaccination rates in your community.

With the overwhelming amount of information out there about the COVID-19 vaccine, it’s understandable that many people have questions.
Find these frequently asked questions, know the facts and feel confident when sharing important virus and vaccine information.

 

Understanding the Variants

 

As the virus continues to spread, sometimes new variants emerge. Sometimes they disappear and other times they persist.

Here are some facts on the most prominent ones right now:

 

"SARS-CoV-2 is the virus that causes a respiratory disease called coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19)."

 

"The Delta variant causes more infections and spreads faster than the original SARS-CoV-2 strain."

 

"The Omicron variant likely will spread more easily than the original SARS-CoV-2 virus."

 

"The COVID-19 vaccines are effective at preventing infection, serious illness, and death."

 

"Vaccine breakthrough infection = the infection of a fully vaccinated person."

The greatest risk of spreading the virus is among unvaccinated people who are more likely to get infected, therefore transmit the virus.

You can find detailed information about all variants by visiting The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website.

The COVID-19 Vaccine

 

Q: Who should get the vaccine?

A: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend that everyone over the age of 5 get vaccinated. The Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine is approved for anyone age 5 and older. The Moderna and the Johnson & Johnson vaccine is approved for anyone 18 years and older.

 

Q: Why should I get the vaccine?

A: Data suggest that the vaccine reduces infection rates, and in break through cases, the vaccination may make symptoms less severe. They show protection against severe illness and hospitalization. The greatest risk for transmission remains among unvaccinated people.

 

Q: Is the vaccine safe?

A: Yes, it was tested in clinical trials with more than 100,00 participants.

 

Q: How was the vaccine developed so far?

A: Researchers began developing the science behind the COIVD-19 vaccine in the early 2000s.

Q: What are the booster shots?

A: The COVID-19 booster shots are the same formula as the first shot (or two).

 

Q: Are there side effects to the vaccine?

A: The vaccine may cause side effects, including pain, redness or swelling in location of the shot, tiredness, headaches, muscle pain, fever or nausea. However, these side effects are normal signs that the body is building protection and should go away after a few days.
 

The Vaccine and Children

 

Q: Should I vaccinate my children?

A: Vaccination helps keep children from getting seriously sick if they get COVID-19. It also allows them to safely participate in school, sports and other group activities.

Q: Are the vaccines safe for children?

A: Yes. Before the vaccines were recommended for children, clinical trials were conducted with thousands of children. No concerns were identified.

The Vaccine and Pregnancy

 

Q: Who should get the vaccine?

A: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend that everyone over the age of 5 get vaccinated. The Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine is approved for anyone age 5 and older. The Moderna and the Johnson & Johnson vaccine is approved for anyone 18 years and older.

 

Q: Why should I get the vaccine?

A: Data suggest that the vaccine reduces infection rates, and in break through cases, the vaccination may make symptoms less severe. They show protection against severe illness and hospitalization. The greatest risk for transmission remains among unvaccinated people.

 

Q: Is the vaccine safe?

A: Yes, it was tested in clinical trials with more than 100,00 participants.

Q: How was the vaccine developed so far?

A: Researchers began developing the science behind the COIVD-19 vaccine in the early 2000s.

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